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The Streets Alive! Community Development Project, the renovation of the F St. Tunnel in the South Salt Creek neighborhood, lets neighbors and school kids safely pass under train tracks that run through the neighborhood. Partners and sponsors came together with neighborhood residents to celebrate.

June is National Outdoors Month. Getting outdoors, even playing in the dirt, is good for your health, say recent studies.

The tunnel near Third and F Streets in the South Salt Creek neighborhood had fallen into disrepair and has now been renovated thanks to the help from Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln.

Mayor Gaylor Baird celebrates completion of the Street Alive! F St. Tunnel project with project organizer, partners, and sponsors and announces date, location, and time of the 2022 Streets Alive! festival.

Dust off that bike and helmet, May is National Bike Month. You don't have to be part of the "spandex crowd" to participate and enjoy it. Check out all of the ways to put the pedal down in the latest Health & the City column

The BA.2 variant is showing up in most new COVID cases, but tracking is imperfect because so many people are testing at home and not reporting their results, making results more dire than they appear, say Dr. Bob Rauner.

With case rates and hospitalizations from COVID-19 plummeting, we are all breathing a collective sigh of relief. People are feeling freer to attend indoor events, go to restaurants and return to in-person church services. Is this the “return to normal” we’ve all been hoping for? Could be, if we don’t let it slip through our fingers.

Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln's Harvest of the Month and WeCook programs in the Community Learning Centers have kids standing in line for a taste of good health.

Falling COVID case and hospitalization rates may lead to lessening of restrictions.

Dr. Bob Rauner, president of Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln, and Lisandra Jorge with El Centro de las Americas talk about the joint outreach to the Hispanic community who are disproportionately affected by COVID.

With all the emphasis on COVID 19, it’s easy to forget that heart disease is still responsible for about 800,000 deaths per year in the U.S. What can you do to protect your heart health? Would it surprise you to know that getting vaccinated for COVID and the flu is on the list?

Three local dads told KOLN/KGIN TV they wanted to help save the lives of other men and families in the Black community by appearing in Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln bus ads.

Dr. Bob Rauner, CMO of OneHealth Nebraska and President of Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln discusses how accountable care organizations work to save money for patients and Medicare through preventative care and standardizing clinical practices.

When frost hits the air, and snow hits the ground, the outdoors can look more like our enemy than our friend. But we can still reap the benefits of the outdoors for our emotional and physical health with some smart planning and a little courage.

With Omicron surging and low booster rates in the city, Lancaster County drops mask mandate. Dr. Bob Rauner, President of Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln, said he disagreed with the timing of the decision, noting that because of the transmissibility of omicron, much of the rest of the world is adding mask mandates and other protective measures.

With more holidays and winter months ahead, get some tips from experts on handling holiday gathering conflict between vaxxed and unvaxxed family and ways to offset the "winter blues".

As many of us prepare to hit the road for holiday gatherings, doctors say that’s fine, but there are extra steps to take to stay safe. Vaccinations are part of that, but as Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln President Dr. Bob Rauner says, “You don’t want to rely on just one thing in public health; you layer things.”

Bob Rauner, the local doctor and President of Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln, who has proved a useful voice on the Lincoln Board of Education during the coronavirus pandemic, had good news and bad news to share at Tuesday night's meeting.

Nebraska’s coronavirus cases and hospitalizations were up again last week, indicating that the delta surge that began over the summer has not yet lost its sting. Nebraska’s case growth appears to be among the top five among the states as new cases nationwide continue to fall.

The flu shot is especially important this year. Flu viruses circulated at historic lows last year due to the pandemic (masking, schools closed, no global travel), the lowest it’s been since 1996. While a nonexistent flu season was a silver lining to the pandemic and necessary to curb COVID19 transmission, it may work against us this year.

Throughout the pandemic, Lincoln nonprofits have stepped up and found innovative ways to serve the community, including reaching out to people in their own neighborhoods.

Streets Alive!" the annual movement festival organized by Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln, returns to the South Salt Creek Neighborhood/Cooper Park area Sunday, Sept. 26 from 1-4:30 p.m. The interactive health and wellness festival encourages people to get out and get active.

After Nebraska doctors continually implore Governor to bring back the COVID dashboard to plan for hospital capacity and other needed resources, he finally restores the dashboard.

The annual “Streets Alive!” free movement festival organized by Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln returns to the South Salt Creek neighborhood/Cooper Park area Sunday, Sept. 26, from 1-4:30 p.m.The interactive health and wellness festival that encourages people to get out and get active will offer join-in activities for visitors of all ages. People are encouraged to walk, bike, skate or dance over a nearly two-mile traffic-free festival route with filled nearly 100 exhibitors, live music and dance, art, join-in fitness classes and sports demos, and fresh local produce.

One of Lincoln's oldest neighborhoods is improving the safety, walkability, and vibrancy of their neighborhood with the F Street Tunnel Project and by hosting Streets Alive!

FDA approval of th PFizer COVID-19 vaccine could persuade more of the hesitant and encourage employers to mandate employees be vaccinated.

Based on current information, HHS officials project that the current COVID vaccine protection against severe hospitalization and death could diminish in the coming months, especially among those at higher risk and those vaccinated in the early phase of the vaccine rollout. Nebraska experts weigh in.

If you're going from working at home to back to your place of employment and you're finding your work clothes a little tight, your mood a little tense, and your brain a little foggy, a brisk walk to the rescue.

Dr. Bob Rauner, LPS Board member, who is also president of Partnership for a healthy Lincoln and Cheif Medical Officer for OneHealth Nebraska, predicts LPS student will be required to wear masks when returning to school this year.

Dr. Rauner sounds off on the "Caught on the Mike" Apple podcast: what we did right about the COVID pandemic, what we did wrong locally and nationally, what the future might hold.

Nebraska’s rural communities have a long way to go to reach the levels of vaccination needed to end the COVID-19 pandemic. Vaccination rates in rural Nebraska badly lag those in urban parts of the state. Public health officials say Nebraska’s lagging rural rates are concerning, especially with a more contagious strain of the virus on the rise and fast becoming dominant nationally..

After being cooped up for a year, everyone, especially kids, wants to get out and about. Here are tips for getting families and kids safely active this summer.

COLLEGE WORLD SERIES - What are the possible repercussions of mass gatherings like the series? Could it be a super spreader event? Dr. Bob Rauner comments in today's Omaha World Herald.

Dr. Bob Rauner, President of Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln, and Dr. Ali Khan, Dean of the UNMC College of Public Health, talk about the importance of keeping the focus on vaccination.

Confused about whether not to continue wearing a mask under some circumstances? Local and national experts answer questions.

Dr. Bob Rauner, president of Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln, joins 3 other Nebraska medical experts to talk about the problem of COVID vaccine hesitancy in Nebraska.

During a pandemic that kept people confined with or isolated from loved ones, as well as the lives they knew, biking became a popular respite - with lots of benefits, physically and mentally.

Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln was awarded a major CDC grant to help increase vaccine access and promote health equity. The award will help fund the efforts of nine community partners and a messaging campaign.

Experts offered stark warnings of a potential surge in Nebraska - vaccine efforts may not be enough. Dr. Bob Rauner, president of Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln, said that people have forgotten the importance of wearing masks and testing, tracing and isolating cases.

The Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln partners with the 2021 Streets Alive! festival hosts, South Salt Creek/Cooper Park neighborhood, and others on a community development project that will improve neighborhood health, vitality, safety, and walkability.

The pandemic "sprouted" a trend. People started gardening in droves and were rewarded with much more than fresh produce - salve for the pandemic soul.

For those anxious to get a COVID vaccine, it can feel a little like treading in shark-invested waters while they wait. Others are choosing to swim with the sharks a little longer. This month's Health and the City column looks at pandemic fatigue and vaccine hesitancy.

Nebraska public health expert, Dr. Bob Rauner, President of Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln, answers frequently asked questions about the COVID vaccines.

The cold weather doesn't have to keep us from being active, but these tips help you to stay warm, upright, fit, and prevent illness during winter.

How can you connect safely during the holidays? Learn what to do to lower the risk at in-person gatherings and find fun and different ways to connect virtually.

There seems to be no shortage of misinformation and bad advice when it comes to dealing with the flu and the flu shot. What do you really know about the flu? Harvard Medical School debunks 10 common myths.

Streets Alive! Online will stream interactive fun on Oct. 4 with join-in fitness and cooking classes, learn-along sports demos, gardening tips, and community resource information. A week long Scavenger Bingo game will give players a chance to win one of seven bikes. The event will be accessible from healthylincoln.org on Oct. 4th.

As if living in a pandemic wasn't enough, flu season is upon us. With lots of locations around the city, including drive through, it's easy to protect yourself and loved ones by getting a flu vaccination now. Then follow the recommendations of health experts to lessen chance of catching the flu, it's severity, or duration.

Parents will always worry about their kids' health. But, imagine having a new baby during a worldwide pandemic, especially if you are first-time parents. Giving birth during a pandemic is frightening enough. But now what, now that the baby is here? Moms and dads wonder, “How do I protect my baby’s health?” “What about breastfeeding?” This week's Health and the City helps parents find answers.

"I wear because I care." A group of Community Breastfeeding Educators found dads from their cultural communities to share a pandemic safety message with their fellow dads to help keep families free of the virus.